ISRO successfully launches Chandrayaan-2, a major leap in Mankind’s moon exploration

Creating yet another milestone in its mission of space exploration, Indian Space Research Organisation or popularly known as the ISRO, on Monday’s successfully launched its much anticipated Chandrayaan-2. The Rover was launched at 2.43pm using powerful rocket GSLV-Mk0III-M1 from Sriharikota today.

Chandrayaan-2 comes 11 years after ISRO’s successful first lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 which scripted history by making more than 3,400 orbits around the Moon and was operational for 312 days till August 29, 2009.

Minutes later, the rocket successfully put Chandrayaan 2 into Earth’s orbit – and a booming applause reverberated inside the control room as the scientists who have been working hard for the mission congratulated one another, hugged and shook hands.

“I am extremely happy to announce that GSLV Mark 3 successfully injected the Chandrayaan 2 into orbit… It is the beginning of a historical journey for India… We fixed a serious technical snag and ISRO bounced back with flying colours,” ISRO Chairman K Sivan said, drawing loud applause from the scientists gathered around him at the control centre.

The rocket propelled into space an orbiter, a lander ‘Vikram’ (named after ISRO founder and eminent Indian scientist Vikram Sarabhai) and a moon rover ‘Pragyaan’. Once the Vikram lander separates, it will head to a region on the moon that is little explored till date – most lunar landings have taken place in the northern hemisphere or in the equatorial region.

A mission by China landed in the northernmost part, followed by Russia’s Luna missions. Most of the American lunar landings, including Apollo missions, were in the Moon’s equatorial region.

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