Wall street journal defies order of the Delhi High court?

Just a couple of days back the Indian media houses received a scatching reprimand from the Delhi High court for revealing name and pictures of Kathua victim during their coverage of the incident.

The court strictly warned the media houses from using names and pictures of child victims and explained that doing so goes completely against the laws of the land. But it seems like some international media houses who perhaps consider themselves to be above Indian judiciary are still adamant on revealing the identity of the victim.

In a latest article on the Wall Street journal titled ‘Hindu Extremists Shrug Off a Depraved Crime’ the name of the victim has been clearly mentioned despite the warning from the apex court. The article was published on 19th April, a day after Delhi High court’s order came.

A well known international media outlet like the Wall Street Journal going against Indian judiciary by revealing identity of a minor victim defying the order of an Indian high court, has raised several serious questions.

Do the international outlets like the WSJ believe that being based out of USA makes them above the Indian laws and they don’t need to obey orders of Indian courts? Even if it is assumed that the article was written before the order came but still had the WSJ wanted they could have edited the portions that goes against the court orders.

Questions are also to be raised at the author of the said article, Sadanand Dhume who being an immanent citizen of India should be well aware about the laws of his land. On Wednesday the Delhi high court bench reminded that under Section 23 (Procedure for media) of the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, any person who discloses the identity of a child victim could be awarded a minimum six months imprisonment.

It would be interesting to see the responses of either the writer Sadanand Dhume or the outlet WSJ about defying the orders of Delhi court, if they decide to respond to it at all.

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